Literacy Winner 2014 Janet Maybin with Mark Sweeney of Wiley Blackwell and Cathy Burnett of Sheffield Hallam University

Literacy Winner 2014 Janet Maybin with Mark Sweeney of Wiley Blackwell and Cathy Burnett of Sheffield Hallam University

Journal of Research in Reading Winner 2014 Yvonne Griffiths with Mark Sweeney of Wiley Blackwell

Journal of Research in Reading Winner 2014 Yvonne Griffiths with Mark Sweeney of Wiley Blackwell

UKLA Wiley-Blackwell Research in Literacy Education Award

UKLA is pleased to announce the winners of the 2014 UKLA / Wiley-Blackwell Research in Literacy Education Awards.

The UKLA/ Wiley-Blackwell Research in Literacy Education Award is a prestigious prize bestowed on the best article in the Journal of Research in Reading (JRR) and Literacy in the previous year. Both are peer-reviewed journals with international reputations for excellence. Editors of both journals, in liaison with members of their boards, submit papers to a panel, who read all of the papers and decide on the winners. The panel this year is chaired by Jackie Marsh and panel members for 2014 are: Clare Dowdall, Lynda Graham, Colin Harrison, Clare Kelly, Becky Parry, Carole Torgerson and Wayne Tennant. 

The winners were announced and the award  presented at the 50th UKLA International Conference at the University of Sussex on Saturday 5th July 2014.

 

Winner 2014 Journal of Research in Reading  (JRR)

Yvonne Griffiths and Morag Stuart (2013)  Reviewing evidence-based practice for pupils with dyslexia and literacy difficulties Journal of Research in Reading Vol 36 (1) pp 96-116

This paper identifies characteristics of successful Wave 2 interventions for  children with dyslexia and literacy difficulties. It moves on to analyse three theoretically motivated single-case intervention studies to examine whether these can provide additional useful insights and guidance for practice in terms of delivering Wave 3 teaching programmes for. The findings indicate that there is a strong evidence base to inform Wave 2 interventions for early word reading difficulties, but more research is needed to inform the planning of Wave 3 interventions. The authors also suggest that further empirical investigation is needed of ways to increase the motivation of children who find reading difficult. The panel felt that the paper was clearly written and would be accessible to a wide readership. The conclusions drawn were warranted by the evidence presented and the critical analysis of the single-case interventions studies was well-conducted. The paper outlines the implications for future research in the area if a sufficiently strong evidence-base for Wave 3 interventions is to be developed.


Click here to read the winning article.(members only)

 

Winner 2014 Literacy

Janet Maybin (2013) What counts as reading? PIRLS, EastEnders and The Man on the Flying Trapeze. Literacy 47 (2): 59-66

This paper contrasts the way in which literacy is conceptualized in official curriucla and examination with the skills and knowledge evident in two unofficial reading activities in a class of 10–11- year-olds. A close discourse analysis is undertaken of two transcripts, in which children discuss an episode of Eastenders and, separately, Jack Prelutsky’s poem ‘The Man on the Flying Trapeze’, Whilst the children’s talk might at one level be dismissed by some as the antithesis of school literacy, given that it is fragmentary and ephemeral rather than written and sustained, in fact the children demonstrate the comprehension skills of retrieval, inference, interpretation and evaluation promoted by the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study and the National Curriculum. The episodes also demonstrate other dimensions of literacy, linked to affect, critique and creativity, that are not adequately measured in current assessment methods and surveys. The panel felt that the paper was significant in its challenge to reductive forms of reading assessment and innovative in terms of the theoretical tools drawn upon to study the children’s talk.  The paper has important implications for policy and practice in terms of the need to contest reductive notions of reading that inform current curricula and assessment tools.

Click here to read the winning article. (members only)

 

 

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